Tag Archives: protein structure

Video Tip of the Week: The PSI SBKB’s New Content Hubs


In today’s tip I will feature the newly organized content hubs over at the Protein Structure Initiative’s Structural Biology Knowledgebase, or PSI SBKB. We do have a free, full-length tutorial on the PSI SBKB that we are in the process of updating, but I thought I’d just touch on one of the new updates to the PSI SBKB now while it is “hot”. :) Quoting from their PSI: Biology in the Spotlight, July 2012 News:

This month, we release a new left menu which highlights our new scientific Hubs. These Hubs are designed to collect PSI and SBKB information so that our audience can find features based on their needs.

I’ve been working with these hubs over the last several months, and have gotten to watch as they have been developed. These scientific hubs make it easy for users to access specific content offered by both the SBKB and the PSI as a whole, because they are organized by content. I think the new left-hand organization is nice – the bright banner and organization will highlight these hubs to users, who will hopefully take full advantage of the resources found in each hub. Currently the scientific hubs are organized around the following content: targets; protein structures, sequences and function; membrane proteins; homology models; and methods. In the tip video I briefly visit the membrane proteins hub and the methods hub to give you an idea of the types of links and contents that you will find, but so be sure to check them out on your own to see what resources you can find for furthering your research.

For further details on the PSI SBKB, see the links below & stay tuned for our full, updated tutorial coming free to a browser near you! :)

Note: the open access papers will not cover the new hubs, but will describe many of the resources accessible from the hubs.

Quick links:
PSI Structural Biology Knowledgebase resource: http://www.sbkb.org

OpenHelix Introductory tutorial on the PSI SBKB (free to access):
http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb

Related resource – RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB): http://www.rcsb.org

Related OpenHelix Introductory tutorial on the RCSB PDB (free to access):
http://www.openhelix.com/pdb

PSI SBKB References:

Gifford LK, Carter LG, Gabanyi MJ, Berman HM, & Adams PD (2012). The Protein Structure Initiative Structural Biology Knowledgebase Technology Portal: a structural biology web resource. Journal of structural and functional genomics, 13 (2), 57-62 PMID: 22527514  (requires subscription)

Gabanyi MJ, Adams PD, Arnold K, Bordoli L, Carter LG, Flippen-Andersen J, Gifford L, Haas J, Kouranov A, McLaughlin WA, Micallef DI, Minor W, Shah R, Schwede T, Tao YP, Westbrook JD, Zimmerman M, & Berman HM (2011). The Structural Biology Knowledgebase: a portal to protein structures, sequences, functions, and methods. Journal of structural and functional genomics, 12 (2), 45-54 PMID: 21472436 (open access here)

Cormier CY, Park JG, Fiacco M, Steel J, Hunter P, Kramer J, Singla R, & LaBaer J (2011). PSI:Biology-materials repository: a biologist’s resource for protein expression plasmids. Journal of structural and functional genomics, 12 (2), 55-62 PMID: 21360289 (open access here)

 

News Updates Related to the PDB (Protein Data Bank), etc.

This is a quick post to update you on events & news items that I’ve gathered that are associated with the Protein Data Bank and other protein resources.

  • We recently received a suggestion for the RCSB PDB through twitter:

    RT @27andaphd: @Comprendia @openhelix you know what? I really think the pdb should have a Firefox toolbar for struct bio ppl like me. cc @openhelix

Well , you are in luck, @27andaphd! I talked to someone on the PDB team and they have you covered with the toolbar, as described in this Summer 2010 newsletter item:  Search the RCSB PDB in Your Web Browser

  • The Structural Biology KnowledgeBase, or SBKB, is a sister database to the RCSB PDB, and last Thursday they released version 4.0 of the SBKB. I’ve been checking out the release & it looks good – they’ve organized categories of information and resources into “hubs”, such as a Structural Targets Hub, a Sequence, Structure, & Function Hub, a Methods Hub, and more. I’m in the process now of updating our sponsored (free) SBKB tutorial now, but you may want to check out the release & see what’s new.

  •  We’ll have more exciting news items soon, so stay tuned!

Quick links:
The Structural Biology KnowledgeBase (SBKB): http://www.sbkb.org/

The Protein Data Bank (PDB) http://www.pdb.org/

OpenHelix’s free introductory tutorial on the SBKB: http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb

OpenHelix’s free introductory tutorial on the PDB: http://www.openhelix.com/pdb

Video Tip of the Week: VnD Resource for Genetic Variation and Drug Information


In today’s tip I am going to feature a resource that I found recently. I’ve been updating our dbSNP tutorial, which Mary & Trey will be presenting at workshops in Morocco, and also our free PDB tutorial, which is sponsored by the RCSB PDB team. I have therefore been thinking about protein structures and small sequence variations a lot lately. As I explored the latest Database issue of NAR looking for resources to do a tip on, I found an article describing the VnD (genetic Variation and Drug) resource, which can also be accessed at the URL www.vandd.org, according to the NAR article. The article is “VnD: a structure-centric database of disease-related SNPs and drugs“, and figure one shows a veritable Who’s Who of protein, variation and disease resources, so I had to investigate.

What I found at VnD made me sure that this was a resource that I wanted to feature in a tip. VnD is from the Korean Bioinformation Center, or KOBIC, who has a list of databases and tools that they provide. I’ll save the rest of the KOBIC resources for another post & concentrate on VnD here. Compiling data from resources such as RefSeq, OMIM, UniProt, PDB, DrugBank, dbSNP, GAD and more might have been cool enough, depending on how it was done, but the VnD also does their own structure modeling analysis on how the variation affects the protein structure and drug/ligand binding.

This tip movie isn’t long enough to really show you the breadth of what is available from the VnD, but I hope it will be enough to encourage you to read the NAR article (listed below), and to check out VnD. One thing to note: don’t expect to find every dbSNP rs# over there – one that I’ve been using in our tutorial isn’t over there. They are specifically interested in variations within genes that might effect drug binding. But hey, you can’t query DrugBank with rs#s, and I’ve never seen the structure modeling done like VnD, so it is a worthy resource that you may want to investigate if you are interested in how genetic variations connect with disease and drug therapies.

Quick links:

VnD: Variations and Drugs resource -  http://vnd.kobic.re.kr:8080/VnD/index.jsp

Korean Bioinformation Center (KOBIC) – http://www.kobic.re.kr/

RCSB PDB – http://www.pdb.org

OpenHelix Tutorial on the RCSB PDB – http://www.openhelix.com/pdb

dbSNP: Short Genetic Variations, from NCBI -  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/SNP/

OpenHelix Tutorial on NCBI’s dbSNP – http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=39

For links to other resources and OpenHelix tutorials mentioned in this post, please see our catalog of resources – http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorials.cgi

Reference:
Yang, J., Oh, S., Ko, G., Park, S., Kim, W., Lee, B., & Lee, S. (2010). VnD: a structure-centric database of disease-related SNPs and drugs Nucleic Acids Research, 39 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkq957

Tip of the Week: From UniProt to the PSI SBKB and Back Again


It is often beneficial to visit multiple biomedical databases or resources, even if they seem to provide overlapping  information because no two resources focus on the exact same information, or present it in exactly the same way. Instead of duplicating each others’ curation efforts, database often link out to related information at other resources. You can think of these links as “social connections”, if you want and in today’s tip I want to show you a couple of connections between protein information resources, including a new connection that really features some of the core value of the PSI’s Structural Biology Knowledgebase, or SBKB.

I begin the tip at the UniProtKB, where I search for a UniProt ID number. From the resulting protein report I first briefly show you how to link out to a corresponding RCSB PDB report, where you can find high quality protein structure information and more. If you are interested in learning more about the RCSB PDB & how to use it, please check out OpenHelix’s full, free tutorial that is sponsored by the RCSB PDB.

From there I return to the UniProt report and demonstrate a new link out option that links to protein protocols, available materials, as well as information about theoretical models and predicted protein targets from the SBKB. I don’t have time to show it but a recent update to the SBKB allows users to now search the Structure Biology Knowledgebase with a UniProt accession number. These searches provide users with additional information including protein structure information and information about pre-released structure sequence. As with the RCSB PDB, we have a free tutorial on the SBKB that is sponsored by the Protein Structure Initiative.

As I scroll through the UniProt protein report users will see information and links for a wide variety of bioscience resources. OpenHelix, as I’m sure many of you are aware, has tutorials on how to use many of these resources. Our tutorials on the RCSB PDB and the PSI SBKB are both free. Our tutorials on UniProt and many other resources are available through a subscription to our database of trainings or through purchase of individual access. Whether you learn the resources through our tutorials, through the references I list below, or through your own explorations of the databases, there really is an amazing amount of information available through these interlinked, publicly-funded resources – please make use of them in your research!

Quick Links:

UniProt Knowledgebase -  http://www.uniprot.org/

OpenHelix Tutorial on UniProt – http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=77

RCSB PDB – http://www.pdb.org

OpenHelix Tutorial on the RCSB PDB – http://www.openhelix.com/pdb

The Protein Structure Initiative Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB) -  http://www.sbkb.org/

OpenHelix Tutorial on the SBKB – http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb

Catalog of all OpenHelix tutorials – http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorials.cgi

References:
The UniProt Consortium. (2009). The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) in 2010 Nucleic Acids Research, 38 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkp846

Rose, P., Beran, B., Bi, C., Bluhm, W., Dimitropoulos, D., Goodsell, D., Prlic, A., Quesada, M., Quinn, G., Westbrook, J., Young, J., Yukich, B., Zardecki, C., Berman, H., & Bourne, P. (2010). The RCSB Protein Data Bank: redesigned web site and web services Nucleic Acids Research, 39 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkq1021

Berman, H., Westbrook, J., Gabanyi, M., Tao, W., Shah, R., Kouranov, A., Schwede, T., Arnold, K., Kiefer, F., Bordoli, L., Kopp, J., Podvinec, M., Adams, P., Carter, L., Minor, W., Nair, R., & Baer, J. (2009). The protein structure initiative structural genomics knowledgebase Nucleic Acids Research, 37 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkn790

RCSB PDB and OpenHelix Announce an Updated Free Tutorial and Training Materials

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements on the RCSB PDB site, and includes a narrated on-line tutorial, PowerPoint slides, handouts, and exercises.

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) April 12, 2011

The Research Collaboratory for Structural Biology (RCSB) Protein Data Bank (PDB) has partnered with OpenHelix to provide a revised and updated tutorial (http://www.openhelix.com/PDB) on its free web based resource for studying biological macromolecules (http://www.pdb.org).

The RCSB PDB provides a variety of tools and resources to use to study biological macromolecules. The PDB is the single worldwide repository of experimentally-determined 3D biological structures of proteins, nucleic acids and complex assemblies. As a member of the Worldwide PDB collaboration (wwpdb.org), the RCSB PDB curates and annotates PDB data, and presents basic and advanced search, display and visualization methods to access these data.

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements on the RCSB PDB site, including a new data drill-down and data summary feature, updated ligand features such as a download page, images and binding affinity data, new report types and visualization options, among many others.

The new training materials (at http://www.openhelix.com/pdb) include an online narrated tutorial that demonstrates: basic and advanced searches, how to generate reports, the different options for exploring individual structures, and many of the research and educational resources and tools available at the RCSB PDB. The approximately 60-minute tutorial, which runs in just about any browser, can be viewed from beginning to end or navigated using chapters and forward and backward sliders.

In addition to the tutorial, RCSB PDB users can also access useful training and teaching materials including the animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested script for the slides, slide handouts, and exercises. This can save a tremendous amount time and effort for teachers and professors to create classroom content.

Users can view the tutorial and download the free materials at http://www.openhelix.com/pdb.

About the RCSB PDB
The RCSB Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org), administered by the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB), supports scientific research and education worldwide by providing an essential resource of information about biomolecular structures. These molecules of life are found in all organisms, from bacteria and plants to animals and humans.

The RCSB PDB member institutions jointly manage the project: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (http://www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to nearly 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.

The Protein Structure Initiative Announces an Updated Free OpenHelix Tutorial and Training Materials for the Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB).

Free tutorial suite on the Structural Biology Knowledgebase includes an online narrated movie, PowerPoint slides, slide handouts and exercises.

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) April 11, 2011

The Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB), a one-stop shop for information about proteins hosted at Rutgers University, has partnered with OpenHelix to provide an updated and revised free tutorial suite (http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb) on its online protein “portal” located at http://sbkb.org/.

The SBKB is a free, comprehensive resource produced through a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health’s Protein Structure Initiative: Biology program and the Nature Publishing Group. The PSI SBKB contains genetic, structural, functional and experimental information about proteins that is easily accessible through a variety of reports and displays. The portal also includes links to many additional resources.

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements to the SBKB, including a recent name change from Structural Genomics Knowledgebase to Structural Biology Knowledgebase, new navigation organization, and remodeled Protein Model Portal reports, among many others.
The online narrated tutorial runs in just about any browser and can be navigated in a number of ways. In about 60 minutes, the tutorial highlights and explains the features and functionality needed to start using the SBKB effectively. The tutorial can be used by new users to introduce them to the protein portal, by previous users to view new features and functionality, or simply as a reference tool to understand specific features.

In addition to the tutorial, users can also access useful training and teaching materials including the animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested script for the slides, slide handouts, and exercises. This can save a tremendous amount time and effort for teachers and professors to create classroom content.

Users can view the tutorials and download the free materials at http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb.

About the PSI
The Protein Structure Initiative (PSI, http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Initiatives/PSI/psi_biology/), which is supported by the National Institutes of Health, is a federal, university and industry effort aimed at dramatically reducing the costs and lessening the time it takes to determine a three-dimensional protein structure. The long-range goal of the PSI is to make the three-dimensional atomic-level structures of most proteins easily obtainable from knowledge of their corresponding DNA sequences. The PSI strives to gain biological insights from new structures and to help the broad biomedical research community make use of PSI research findings.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (http://www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to over 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.

Protein Structure Analysis – How Far We’ve Come!

The team here at OpenHelix has recently updated our sponsored tutorials on two excellent structural biology resources, the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PBD) and the PSI-Nature Structural Biology Knowledgebase (PSI SBKB). Because the tutorials are sponsored by these resources they are free for anyone to view and download in full. You can access our training materials for the resources at our RCSB PDB landing page, or our PSI SBKB landing page. I’m very happy with both tutorial suites, so please check them out.

As my personal celebration for these releases I have been reading a variety of articles showing the scope of how far our abilities to analyze protein structures have come. The first article is one that Mary pointed me to a while back, which discusses the infancy of bioinformatics, entitled “The Roots of Bioinformatics in Protein Evolution” by RF Doolittle (cited below, as are all articles mentioned). In this wonderful perspective Dr. Doolittle describes a time when DNA sequencing was unimaginable and protein sequencing was laborious, slow, and yet so new that each day was full of excitement as one more amino acid was identified. It is a revealing glimpse at a research era gone by – to quote Doolittle, “Science as an endeavor thrives on obsolescence.” – and mentions the contributions of Margaret Dayhoff, who Mary has blogged about.

The next historical article that I read was entitled “The Early Years of Retroviral Protease Crystal Structures” by M Miller (freely available on PMC). As you can tell from the title, this covers a time more recent than the Doolittle article, when protein crystallization studies were possible. Dr. Miller traces the X-ray crystal studies of retroviral proteases at the NCI-Fredrick in the late 1980′s and early 1990′s, and she describes how chemical synthesis of HIV1-PR was critical to obtaining enough protein for crystallization and how the crystal structure of it (deposited into the PDB archive and therefore freely available for all researchers to study) was invaluable for the design of inhibitors of HIV1-PR as anti-AIDS drugs.

I’ve also be perusing more recent papers that highlight how protein structures can aid biological investigations. These include: “Structure of mammalian AMPK and its regulation by ADP“,  “Bioinformatics analysis of disordered proteins in prokaryotes“, “Crystal structure of inhibitor of κB kinase β” and others. It would also be fun to attend “The 25th Annual Meeting of the Groups Studying the Structures of AIDS-Related Systems and Their Application to Targeted Drug Design” to learn more, but alas I will not be in the area at the time of the meeting. As I’ve posted before, I am a geneticist by education. To me seeing the development of protein studies (through the historical reviews) and the studies currently occurring in the field of structural biology, combined with the amazing offerings available freely through both the RCSB PDB and the PSI SBKB really does feel like an appropriate, and enjoyable, celebration for the completion of our tutorial updates. Let me know what you think about them, when you get a chance! :)

Updated freely available sponsored tutorials; movie, slides, exercises to use:

References:

  • Berman, H. (2000). The Protein Data Bank Nucleic Acids Research, 28 (1), 235-242 DOI: 10.1093/nar/28.1.235
  • Berman, H., Westbrook, J., Gabanyi, M., Tao, W., Shah, R., Kouranov, A., Schwede, T., Arnold, K., Kiefer, F., Bordoli, L., Kopp, J., Podvinec, M., Adams, P., Carter, L., Minor, W., Nair, R., & Baer, J. (2009). The protein structure initiative structural genomics knowledgebase Nucleic Acids Research, 37 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkn790
  • Doolittle, R. (2010). The Roots of Bioinformatics in Protein Evolution PLoS Computational Biology, 6 (7) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000875
  • Miller, M. (2010). The early years of retroviral protease crystal structures Biopolymers, 94 (4), 521-529 DOI: 10.1002/bip.21387

Tip of the Week: PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase

Last January I did a tip that featured the monthly Structural Genomics Update, which is essentially a newsletter and article collection from PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase (SGKB). However, the update is just one aspect of what SGKB offers. In today’s tip I want to feature the wonderfully efficient ways that Structural Genomics Knowledgebase provides you with to learn about the proteins that you are interested in. What I tried to stress in this tip is the different emphasis that Structural Genomics has compared to the RCSB PDB. The RCSB PDB is a GREAT resource, which we also have free tutorial on, but it was created by and for structural biologists. Its displays feature angstroms, angles, conformers and more.

Me, I’m a Molecular Biologist by training & I think about proteins in terms of genomes, pathways, medical relevance, molecular functions, and the like. The SGKB thinks like me, and even organizes information and links into those sorts of categories. I really like how it presents protein information to me, and in the process how it eases me into thinking about the more ‘hard core’ structural details that I see in PDB. The tip is just a teaser taste of the SGKB – if I peak your interest, please do check out OpenHelix’s full, free introductory tutorial on the PSI-SGKB (sponsored by PSI SGKB) as well as the site itself. You never know, you might just learn to love a crystal! :^)

Quick note: SGKB and PDB tutorials

We recently announced a free tutorial (sponsored by PSI) on the Structural Genomics Knowledgebase (SGKB). I thought it might be of interest to our readers. You can access the free tutorial (approx. a 1hr movie, slides, handouts and exercises) here.

We will also soon announce a free tutorial on the Protein Database (PDB), but you can already access it here.

For a full list of our free tutorials and training materials, click here (about a dozen), or view our other 80 or more tutorials on a wide range of topics by subscription.

The Protein Structure Initiative announces free OpenHelix tutorial and training materials for the Structural Genomics Knowledgebase (SGKB)

Free tutorial and training materials available for the Structural Genomics Knowledgebase bionformatics resource

Working with OpenHelix to provide online training materials and increased visibility is an effective way to add to our efforts

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) March 18, 2010 — The Structural Genomics Knowledgebase(SGKB), a one-stop shop for information about proteins hosted at Rutgers University, has partnered with OpenHelixTM to provide free comprehensive training and outreach programs for its online protein “portal” located at http://kb.psi-structuralgenomics.org.

The SGKB is a free, comprehensive resource produced through a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health’s Protein Structure Initiative and Nature Publishing Group. The PSI SGKB contains genetic, structural, functional and experimental information about proteins that is easily accessible through a variety of reports and displays. The portal also includes links to many additional resources.

“Structural genomics is fast emerging as an essential tool in expanding our knowledge of the role of proteins in biology and in disease,” said OpenHelix founder and CSO Dr. Warren Lathe. “OpenHelix is excited to contribute to furthering this field by assisting researchers in effectively and efficiently using this powerful resource.”

The new training initiatives include a free online tutorial suite on how to use/search/find/etc. the SGKB.

The online narrated tutorial runs in just about any browser and can be navigated in a number of ways. In about 60 minutes, the tutorial highlights and explains the features and functionality needed to start using the SGKB effectively. The tutorial can be used by new users to introduce them to the protein portal, by previous users to view new features and functionality or simply as a reference tool to understand specific features.

In addition to the tutorial, SGKB users can also access useful training materials, including the animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested talking points for the slides, slide handouts and exercises. This can save a tremendous amount time and effort for educators looking to create classroom content.

Users can view the tutorials and download the free materials at http://www.openhelix.com/sgkb .

OpenHelix also has created a free Quick Reference Card for the SGKB. The Quick Reference card highlights search strategies, features and functionality. The cards can be ordered in packs of 30 from www.openhelix.com, and shipping is free within the United States.

“The SGKB sets itself apart by incorporating so many different types of biological data (genetic, structural, theoretical, functional, protocol, etc.) that is really is a ‘one-stop shop’ for a broad range of biological and biomedical fields. The challenge for training and outreach is to make this data accessible and understandable to scientists across different disciplines,” said Dr. Helen Berman, head of the SGKB. “Working with OpenHelix to provide online training materials and increased visibility is an effective way to add to our efforts.”

In addition to the SGKB tutorial suite, OpenHelix offers nearly 90 tutorial suites on some of the most powerful and popular bioinformatics and genomics tools available on the web. Some of the tutorial suites are freely available through support from the resource providers. The whole catalog of tutorial suites is available through a subscription. Users can view the tutorials and download the free materials atwww.openhelix.com.

About the PSI
The Protein Structure Initiative (PSI, http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Initiatives/PSI/), which is supported by the National Institutes of Health, is a federal, university and industry effort aimed at dramatically reducing the costs and lessening the time it takes to determine a three-dimensional protein structure. The long-range goal of the PSI is to make the three-dimensional atomic-level structures of most proteins easily obtainable from knowledge of their corresponding DNA sequences. The PSI strives to gain biological insights from new structures and to help the broad biomedical research community make use of PSI research findings.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to nearly 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.