Tag Archives: Prosite

Many Protein Resources Have Recently Announced Updates

PDB structure 3rg9

 

 

 

 

In our ongoing pursuit of up-to-date tutorials, I’ve been tracking changes that are occurring at resources and planning our updates accordingly. Protein resources are especially going to keep me out of trouble this summer, because their developers and curators have been busy! I’ve compiled a short synopsis below, and would appreciate comments on any other resources you know about, or want to brag about! :)

  • I featured the ExPASy list of proteomic tools in a past tip. As of  Tuesday this list is no longer being kept up-to-date, but the ExPASy resource has been expanded beyond being “just” a proteomics resource and is now the new SIB Bioinformatics Resource Portal. According to its developers, the portal:

    “provides access to scientific databases and software tools in different areas of life sciences including proteomics, genomics, phylogeny, systems biology, population genetics, transcriptomics etc. … On this portal you find resources from many different SIB groups as well as external institutions.”

    And never fear, there is still an up-to-date list of proteomics tools found here.

  • I mentioned in my tip last week that NCBI’s MMDB has undergone an update & I’ll be updating our tutorial on it soon.
  • NCI/Nature Pathway Interaction Database, or PID, had an update June 14th that includes new and updated pathway information.
  • PROSITE had an update June 21st, which is Release 20.73, and now includes 1618 documentation entries, 1308 patterns, 936 profiles and 925 ProRules.
  • The RCSB PDB resource has announced updates to their Browse Database function, enhanced sequence displays from structure summary pages and the PDB-101 educational resource available from blackboard logos on PDB pages. For more details on using PDB, please see our free PDB Introductory tutorial sponsored by the RCSB.
  • STRING’s 9.0 release is now available, and we’ll be looking into anything we need to update in our tutorial as a result.
  • UniProt released an update June 28th that included a major update on many bacterial and archaeal Type II Toxin-Antitoxin modules, as is described here.

Enjoy all the new information – I know I will! :)

New and Updated Online Tutorials for PROSITE, InterPro, IntAct and UniProt

Comprehensive tutorials on the publicly available PROSITE, InterPro, IntAct and UniProt databases enable researchers to quickly and effectively use these invaluable resources.

Seattle January 14, 2009 — OpenHelix today announced the availability of new tutorial suites on PROSITE, InterPro and IntAct, in addition to a newly updated tutorial on UniProt. PROSITE is a database that can be used to browse and search for information on protein domains, functional sites and families, InterPro is a database that integrates protein signature data from the major protein databases into a single comprehensive resource and IntAct is a protein interaction database with valuable tools that can be used to search for, analyze and graphically display protein interaction data from a wide variety of species. UniProt is a detailed curated knowledgebase about known proteins, with predictions and computational assignments for both characterized and uncharacterized proteins. These three new tutorials and an updated UniProt tutorial, in conjunction with the additional OpenHelix tutorials on MINT, PDB, Pfam, STRING, SMART, Entrez Protein, MMDB and many others, give the researcher an excellent set of training resources to assist in their protein research.

The tutorial suites, available for single purchase or through a low- priced yearly subscription to all OpenHelix tutorials, contain a narrated, self-run, online tutorial, slides with full script, handouts
and exercises. With the tutorials, researchers can quickly learn to effectively and efficiently use these resources. These tutorials will teach users:

PROSITE

*how to access information on domains, functional sites and protein families in PROSITE
*to perform a quick and an advanced protein sequence scan
*to find patterns in protein sequences using PRATT
*to use MyDomains to create custom domain graphics

InterPro

  • to use both the basic and advanced search tools to find detailed information on entries in InterPro
  • how to understand and customize the display of your results
  • to use InterProScan to query novel protein sequences for information on domains and families

IntAct

  • how to perform basic and advanced searches to find protein interaction data
  • to effectively navigate and understand the various data views
  • to graphically display and manipulate a protein interaction network

UniProt

  • to perform text searches for relevant protein information
  • to search with sequences as a starting point
  • to understand the different types of UniProt records

To find out more about these and other tutorial suites visit the OpenHelix Tutorial Catalog and OpenHelix or visit the OpenHelix Blog for up-to-date information on genomics.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, provides the genomics knowledge you need when you need it. OpenHelix currently provides online self-run tutorials and on-site training for institutions and companies on the most powerful and popular free, web based, publicly accessible bioinformatics resources. In addition, OpenHelix is contracted by resource providers to provide comprehensive, long-term training and outreach programs.

Tip of the Week: Draw your own domains

prosite_mydomain1.jpgThere are some amazingly complicated programs in bioinformatics that do everything from assembling your genome to analyzing its evolutionary relationships and then make breakfast for you. Well, ok, not so many of them do the breakfast part. But the range and functionality of these tools is really tremendous.

However–there are times when users have simple needs and just want a quick way to make a diagram or an illustration of biological features. The MyDomains tool at Prosite is one way to make a quick diagram of items you would like on a sequence of interest. You can choose domain shapes, colors, indicate intervals and flag sites.

I can see this being handy for seminars, exams, grants, or any other place you might need a little custom diagram to represent features on a sequence. We have a longer tutorial in our catalog about the many other terrific features of Prosite, but here’s a quick look at a simple tool to make quality domain diagrams come to life.