Tag Archives: mapviewer

Announcement of Updated Tutorial Materials: UniProt, Overview of Genome Browsers, and World Tour of Resources

As many of you know, OpenHelix specializes in helping people access and utilize the gold mine of public bioscience data in order to further research.  One of the ways that we do this is by creating materials to train people – researchers, clinicians, librarians, and anyone interested in science - on where to find data they are interested in, and how to access data at particular public databases and data repositories. We’ve got over 100 such tutorials on everything from PubMed to the Functional Glycomics Gateway (more on that later).

In addition creating these tutorials, we also spend a lot of time to keep them accurate and up-to-date. This can be a challenge, especially when lots of databases or resources all have major releases around the same time. Our team continually assesses and updates our materials and in this post I am happy to announce recently released updates to three of our tutorials: UniProt, World Tour, and Overview of Genome Browsers.

Our Introductory UniProt tutorial shows users how to: perform text searches at UniProt for relevant protein information, search with sequences as a starting point, understand the different types of UniProt records, and create multi-sequence alignments from protein records using Clustal.

Our Overview of Genome Browsers introduces users to introduce Ensembl, Map Viewer, UCSC Genome Browser, the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) browser, and to the GBrowse software system. We also touch on WebGBrowse, JBrowse, the Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV), the ARGO Genome Browser, the Integrated Genome Browser (IGB)GAGGLE, and the Circular Genome Viewer, or CGView.

Our World Tour of Genomics Resources is free and accessible without registration. It includes a tour of example resources, organized by categories such as Algorithms and Analysis tools, expression resources, genome browsers (both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic/Microbial) , Literature and text mining resources, and resources focused on nucleotides, proteins, pathways, disease and variation. This main discussion will then lead into a discussion of how to find resources with the free OpenHelix Resource Search Portal, followed by learning to use resources with OpenHelix tutorials, and a discussion of additional methods of learning about resources.

Quick Links:

OpenHelix Introductory UniProt tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=77

OpenHelix Overview to Genome Browsers tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=65

Free OpenHelix World Tour of Genomics Resources tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=119

 


New and Updated Online Tutorials for Ensembl Legacy and Overview of Genome Browsers

Comprehensive tutorials on the publicly available Ensembl and an overview of genome browsers enable researchers to quickly and effectively use these invaluable resources.

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) April 26, 2010 — OpenHelix today announced the availability of a new tutorial on Ensembl, and an updated tutorial suite on the Overview of Genome Browsers.

Ensembl is a genome browser to visualize and analyze human and many other species genomes. Though Ensembl recently updated the browser software, many species genome browsers still use the older versions of the browser. OpenHelix has a tutorial on the latest version, and has now created a new tutorial, Ensembl Legacy, to acquaint researchers with the older versions they might encounter. Overview of Genome Browsers is an updated tutorials which introduces researchers to some of the more popular genome browsers including Ensembl, Map Viewer, UCSC Genome Browser, the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) browser and the GBrowse software. These two tutorials, in conjunction with larger, in-depth OpenHelix tutorials on UCSC Genome and Table Browsers, GBrowse. IMG, IMG/M, Ensembl and MapViewer and others will give you a set of training resources to help be efficient and effective at accessing and analyzing genome data.

The tutorial suites, available through an annual OpenHelix subscription, contain an online, narrated, multimedia tutorial, which runs in just about any browser connected to the web, along with slides with full script, handouts and exercises. With the tutorials, researchers can quickly learn to effectively and efficiently use these resources. The scripts, handouts and other materials can also be used as a reference or for training others.

These tutorials will teach users:

Ensembl Legacy

*about the Ensembl software and its developers
*how to access older versions of the browser from the Ensembl archive
*the differences and similarities between versions
*about some example installations of Ensembl at other databases

Overview of Genome Browsers

*where to find these 5 useful tools
*an overview of the organization and display features
*some guidance on how or why to choose a given browser for your research needs
To find out more about these and over 85 other tutorial suites visit the OpenHelix Catalog and OpenHelix. Or visit the OpenHelix Blog for up-to-date information on genomics and genomics resources.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to nearly 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.

How do you represent genomes?

cnv_1Not just the genome, but genomeS. As Jan at Saaien Tist has mentioned, human (and other species) genomes are quiet variable. Though the linear representation of genome browsers makes perfect sense (like the UCSC Genome Browser, Ensembl, GBrowse and MapViewer among others) for much annotated data of the genome, structural variations are not so well visualized in a linear representation. And, as we are find the human and other specie genomes are quite variable, we might need to come up with another way to visualize these genomic data beyond the ‘reference genome’ linear model. Jan suggests deBruijn graphs,
pictured here. I find some difficulty in ‘visualizing’ how these are going to work for the _other_ annotations in the data. Though this representation looks like it might work great for CNV and the like, it seems to make viewing other types of data (expression, SNP, etc) more complicated. I’m looking forward to see how this develops.

Or perhaps we’ll be looking at genomes like this (ok, maybe not, but it’s geeky cool).

Finding Flies

I finally got around to reading last month’s Nature paper on the genomic sequence of 12 Drosophila species. In addition to being genomics research (which is my field now :), it is also looking at 12 of the couple dozen species I studied for my Ph.D. (though I was only looking at the evolution of R1 & R2 retroposons in arthropods).Interesting paper, and I might go into it more in depth later (what genomics means and doesn’t mean for evolutionary studies).

But I did get to thinking, where would I go to browse and search the genomic sequence data for these 12 species ( hey, I might want to recreate my work, though the Eickbush lab already has.. and extended). Of course there are the two browsers mentioned in the paper ;-), Flybase and UCSC Genome Browser, though UCSC doesn’t include D. willistoni as I write this. I checked the other two major general genome browsers, as opposed to species or taxa specific: Ensembl and NCBI’s MapViewer. Continue reading