Tag Archives: genotype – phenotype

genonets_quickstart

Video Tip of the Week: Genonets, exploring genotype-phenotype relationships

Lately I’ve been keeping an eye on a lot of the tools that link individuals with sequence data, their phenotypes, and researchers/physicians who may either study or treat the associated medical issues (see MyGene2 most recently) . But there’s a lot of room upstream of these kinds of patient outcomes to explore genotypes and phenotypes. This week’s Video Tip of the Week is for Genonets, offering “Analysis and Visualization of Genotype Networks”, a tool that can help to explore these relationships for pre-clinical/research scenarios as well.

A recent paper explains the goals behind their tools, and they also have a series of videos on their web site to help you get going with Genonets. I’ll put the intro video here, but be sure to click over to their “Learn Genonets” page for a lot more. There’s also a text-based tutorial you can work through which is helpful.

You can also kick the tires a bit with a sample file that’s available from their search page. Just click the checkbox to load it up and try it out. And then be sure to explore those “deep dives” videos to go further.

Hat tip: 

Quick link:

Genonets: http://ieu-genonets.uzh.ch

Reference:

Khalid, F., Aguilar-Rodríguez, J., Wagner, A., & Payne, J. (2016). Genonets server—a web server for the construction, analysis and visualization of genotype networks Nucleic Acids Research DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkw313

Video Tip of the Week: 1000 Genomes Dataset Browser from NCBI


A recent NCBI Newsletter announced the release of a new resource named the 1000 Genomes Dataset Browser, and that is the resource that I will be featuring in this tip. It is one of the tools available through the new NCBI Variation resources page, which also features resources such as dbSNP, dbVar, dbGaP and ClinVar (many of which OpenHelix has tutorials for) as well as other variation tools – Variation Reporter (pre-release version), Clinical Remap (beta version) and the Phenotype-Genotype Integrator.

Before I discuss NCBI’s 1000 Genomes Dataset Browser, I’d like to spend a bit of time on the 1000 Genomes project, in order to distinguish what is from NCBI and what is from the project itself. From the 1000 Genomes Pilot paper:

“The aim of the 1000 Genomes Project is to discover, genotype and provide accurate haplotype information on all forms of human DNA polymorphism in multiple human populations. Specifically, the goal is to characterize over 95% of variants that are in genomic regions accessible to current high-throughput sequencing technologies and that have allele frequency of 1% or higher (the classical definition of polymorphism) in each of five major population groups (populations in or with ancestry from Europe, East Asia, South Asia, West Africa and the Americas).”

You can access the full paper from the link below. The project has now moved past the pilot phase and is releasing new data all the time. You can see announcements and project details, or access that data, through the official 1000 Genomes project site, or through the official 1000 Genomes version of the Ensembl Browser. As you might imagine for a “big data” project such as this, data has been added to a variety of NCBI databases, including dbSNP, the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) and BioSample. Although you could search for this data through the universal Entrez search system, previously to view the data you would have to view individual results at each separate database. The 1000 Genomes Browser at NCBI has been created as a powerful interface for comprehensively searching for, and viewing, 1000 Genomes data contained in NCBI resources on a single page.

In the video tip I will familiarize you to the various areas of the page - the browser is created with series of widgets, each with its own function. I will not be able to cover all of the features, or demonstrate how users can upload their own variation data to the browser – I’ll leave you the fun of exploring those on your own. Because the tool is so young, bugs and suggestions/comments are still being actively requested – if you find something, check out the FAQs (which discuss bugs at various stages of being fixed) and then email the team.

Quick Links:
NCBI Newsletter announcement July 20, 2012: http://1.usa.gov/RQu5dR

NCBI Variation page: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/variation/

NCBI 1000 Genomes Browser page:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/variation/tools/1000genomes/

1000 Genomes Project site: http://www.1000genomes.org/home

The 1000 genomes project specific version of the Ensembl Browser:
http://browser.1000genomes.org

Reference:
The 1000 Genomes Project Consortium (2010). A map of human genome variation from population-scale sequencing Nature, 467, 1061-1073 DOI: 10.1038/nature09534