Tag Archives: Gaggle

Announcement of Updated Tutorial Materials: UniProt, Overview of Genome Browsers, and World Tour of Resources

As many of you know, OpenHelix specializes in helping people access and utilize the gold mine of public bioscience data in order to further research.  One of the ways that we do this is by creating materials to train people – researchers, clinicians, librarians, and anyone interested in science - on where to find data they are interested in, and how to access data at particular public databases and data repositories. We’ve got over 100 such tutorials on everything from PubMed to the Functional Glycomics Gateway (more on that later).

In addition creating these tutorials, we also spend a lot of time to keep them accurate and up-to-date. This can be a challenge, especially when lots of databases or resources all have major releases around the same time. Our team continually assesses and updates our materials and in this post I am happy to announce recently released updates to three of our tutorials: UniProt, World Tour, and Overview of Genome Browsers.

Our Introductory UniProt tutorial shows users how to: perform text searches at UniProt for relevant protein information, search with sequences as a starting point, understand the different types of UniProt records, and create multi-sequence alignments from protein records using Clustal.

Our Overview of Genome Browsers introduces users to introduce Ensembl, Map Viewer, UCSC Genome Browser, the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) browser, and to the GBrowse software system. We also touch on WebGBrowse, JBrowse, the Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV), the ARGO Genome Browser, the Integrated Genome Browser (IGB)GAGGLE, and the Circular Genome Viewer, or CGView.

Our World Tour of Genomics Resources is free and accessible without registration. It includes a tour of example resources, organized by categories such as Algorithms and Analysis tools, expression resources, genome browsers (both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic/Microbial) , Literature and text mining resources, and resources focused on nucleotides, proteins, pathways, disease and variation. This main discussion will then lead into a discussion of how to find resources with the free OpenHelix Resource Search Portal, followed by learning to use resources with OpenHelix tutorials, and a discussion of additional methods of learning about resources.

Quick Links:

OpenHelix Introductory UniProt tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=77

OpenHelix Overview to Genome Browsers tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=65

Free OpenHelix World Tour of Genomics Resources tutorial suite: http://www.openhelix.com/cgi/tutorialInfo.cgi?id=119

 


Tip of the Week: A year in tips III (last half of 2010)

As you may know, we’ve been doing tips-of-the-week for three years now. We have completed around 150 little tidbit introductions to various resources. At the end of the year we’ve established a sort of holiday tradition: we are doing a summary post to collect them all. If you have missed any of them it’s a great way to have a quick look at what might be useful to your work.

Here are the tips from the first half of the year, and below you will find the tips from the last half of 2010 (you can see past years’ tips here: 2008 I2008 II2009 I2009 II):

July

July 7: Mint for Protein Interactions, an introduction to MINT to study protein-protein interactions
July 14: Introduction to Changes to NCBI’s Protein Database, as it states :D
July 21: 1000 Genome Project Browser, 1000 Genomes project has pilot data out, this is the browser.
July 28: R Genetics at Galaxy, the Galaxy analysis and workflow tool added R genetics analysis tools.

August

August 4: YeastMine, SGD adds an InterMine capability to their database search.
August 11: Gaggle Genome Browser, a tool to allow for the visualization of genomic data, part of the “gaggle components”
August 18: Brenda, comprehensive enzyme information.
August 25: Mouse Genomic Pathology, unlike other tips, this is not a video but rather a detailed introduction to a new website.

September

September 1: Galaxy Pages, and introduction to the new community documentation and sharing capability at Galaxy.
September 8: Varitas. A Plaid Database. A resource that integrates human variation data such as SNPs and CNVs.
September 15: CircuitsDB for TF/miRNA/gene regulation networks.
September 21: Pathcase for pathway data.
September 29: Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), VennViewer. A new tool to create Venn diagrams to compare associated datasets for genes, diseases or chemicals.

October

October 6: BioExtract Server, a server that allows researcher to store data, analyze data and create workflows of data.
October 13: NCBI Epigenomics, “Beyond the Genome” NCBI’s site for information and data on epigenetics.
October 20: Comparing Microbial Databases including IMG, UCSC Microbial and Archeal browsers, CMR and others.
October 27: iTOL, interactive tree of life

November

November 3: VISTA Enhancer Browser explore possible regulatory elements with comparative genomics
November 10: Getting canonical gene info from the UCSC Browser. Need one gene version to ‘rule them all’?
November 17: ENCODE Data in the UCSC Genome Browser, an entire 35 minute tutorial on the ENCODE project.
November 24: FLink. A tool that links items in one NCBI database to another in a meaningful and weighted manner.

December

December 1: PhylomeDB. A database of gene phylogenies of many species.
December 8: BioGPS for expression data and more.
December 15: RepTar, a database of miRNA target sites.

Can you spare a genome browser?

Recently I’ve been coming across more and more requests and need for genome annotation and visualization software. Genomes are being completed left and right and researchers need ways to browse and annotate these genomes. There are a lot of tools out there. This post is a quick attempt to start listing those. It is not exhaustive right now, right now there are the ones off the top of my head and those focused a bit on visualization (though there is annotation). I plan to expand this list (have any to suggest) and enhance it with more descriptions as time goes forward. Probably make it a page if it becomes useful enough. I’m not listing databases (such as UCSC Genome Browser, RGD, Ensembl, Flybase, but rather software that researchers can use to create such browsable genomes). So, here we go…

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