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RCSB PDB and OpenHelix Announce an Updated Free Tutorial and Training Materials

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements on the RCSB PDB site, and includes a narrated on-line tutorial, PowerPoint slides, handouts, and exercises.

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) April 12, 2011

The Research Collaboratory for Structural Biology (RCSB) Protein Data Bank (PDB) has partnered with OpenHelix to provide a revised and updated tutorial (http://www.openhelix.com/PDB) on its free web based resource for studying biological macromolecules (http://www.pdb.org).

The RCSB PDB provides a variety of tools and resources to use to study biological macromolecules. The PDB is the single worldwide repository of experimentally-determined 3D biological structures of proteins, nucleic acids and complex assemblies. As a member of the Worldwide PDB collaboration (wwpdb.org), the RCSB PDB curates and annotates PDB data, and presents basic and advanced search, display and visualization methods to access these data.

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements on the RCSB PDB site, including a new data drill-down and data summary feature, updated ligand features such as a download page, images and binding affinity data, new report types and visualization options, among many others.

The new training materials (at http://www.openhelix.com/pdb) include an online narrated tutorial that demonstrates: basic and advanced searches, how to generate reports, the different options for exploring individual structures, and many of the research and educational resources and tools available at the RCSB PDB. The approximately 60-minute tutorial, which runs in just about any browser, can be viewed from beginning to end or navigated using chapters and forward and backward sliders.

In addition to the tutorial, RCSB PDB users can also access useful training and teaching materials including the animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested script for the slides, slide handouts, and exercises. This can save a tremendous amount time and effort for teachers and professors to create classroom content.

Users can view the tutorial and download the free materials at http://www.openhelix.com/pdb.

About the RCSB PDB
The RCSB Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org), administered by the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB), supports scientific research and education worldwide by providing an essential resource of information about biomolecular structures. These molecules of life are found in all organisms, from bacteria and plants to animals and humans.

The RCSB PDB member institutions jointly manage the project: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (http://www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to nearly 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.

The Protein Structure Initiative Announces an Updated Free OpenHelix Tutorial and Training Materials for the Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB).

Free tutorial suite on the Structural Biology Knowledgebase includes an online narrated movie, PowerPoint slides, slide handouts and exercises.

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) April 11, 2011

The Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB), a one-stop shop for information about proteins hosted at Rutgers University, has partnered with OpenHelix to provide an updated and revised free tutorial suite (http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb) on its online protein “portal” located at http://sbkb.org/.

The SBKB is a free, comprehensive resource produced through a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health’s Protein Structure Initiative: Biology program and the Nature Publishing Group. The PSI SBKB contains genetic, structural, functional and experimental information about proteins that is easily accessible through a variety of reports and displays. The portal also includes links to many additional resources.

The new tutorial reflects the many changes and enhancements to the SBKB, including a recent name change from Structural Genomics Knowledgebase to Structural Biology Knowledgebase, new navigation organization, and remodeled Protein Model Portal reports, among many others.
The online narrated tutorial runs in just about any browser and can be navigated in a number of ways. In about 60 minutes, the tutorial highlights and explains the features and functionality needed to start using the SBKB effectively. The tutorial can be used by new users to introduce them to the protein portal, by previous users to view new features and functionality, or simply as a reference tool to understand specific features.

In addition to the tutorial, users can also access useful training and teaching materials including the animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested script for the slides, slide handouts, and exercises. This can save a tremendous amount time and effort for teachers and professors to create classroom content.

Users can view the tutorials and download the free materials at http://www.openhelix.com/sbkb.

About the PSI
The Protein Structure Initiative (PSI, http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Initiatives/PSI/psi_biology/), which is supported by the National Institutes of Health, is a federal, university and industry effort aimed at dramatically reducing the costs and lessening the time it takes to determine a three-dimensional protein structure. The long-range goal of the PSI is to make the three-dimensional atomic-level structures of most proteins easily obtainable from knowledge of their corresponding DNA sequences. The PSI strives to gain biological insights from new structures and to help the broad biomedical research community make use of PSI research findings.

About OpenHelix
OpenHelix, LLC, (http://www.openhelix.com) provides a bioinformatics and genomics search and training portal, giving researchers one place to find and learn how to use resources and databases on the web. The OpenHelix Search portal searches hundreds of resources, tutorial suites and other material to direct researchers to the most relevant resources and OpenHelix training materials for their needs. Researchers and institutions can save time, budget and staff resources by leveraging a subscription to over 100 online tutorial suites available through the portal. More efficient use of the most relevant resources means quicker and more effective research.

Explore Open Access Bioinformatics Tools with the Free “World Tour of Genomics Resources” Tutorial Suite

Online tutorial gives researchers and scientists a place to learn about the many biology resources available to them.

Quote  startThese links assist scientists by guiding them to relevant technical tutorials on resources which may be unfamiliar to them. Thanks to this partnership with OpenHelix, BioMed Central journals are able to make their scientific content more useful and access.Quote end

Bellevue, WA (PRWEB) April 6, 2011

The science community now has a valuable launching point to explore and find the many bioinformatics and genomics resources available to them through the “World Tour of Genomics Resources” tutorial suite by OpenHelix.

The free tutorial suite includes a sampling of resources organized by categories such as algorithms and analysis tools, expression resources, genome browsers (both eukaryotic and prokaryotic/microbial), literature and text mining resources, and resources focused on nucleotides, proteins, pathways, disease and variation.

In each category, the tutorial explores not only the most popular resources, but also some lesser known ones that fill unique scientific needs or are especially helpful to researchers.

The tour also shows easy ways of accomplishing the difficult task of finding and learning about other resources with the free OpenHelix search tool, tutorial suites, and other tools.

“With the ever expanding data sets and resources of the genomics era” said Warren (Trey) Lathe, Chief Science Officer at OpenHelix, “this tutorial suite fills the critical need of giving scientists an overview of resources and showing them ways to find them and learn how to use them.”

The online narrated tutorial, which runs in just about any browser, can be viewed from beginning to end or navigated using chapters and forward and backward sliders.

Included in the tutorial suite are animated PowerPoint slides used as a basis for the tutorial, suggested script for the slides, slide handouts, and aa list of the resources and tutorial landing pages mentioned in the tutorial. This saves a tremendous amount time and effort for teachers and professors to give this tour to others.

A companion piece to this free tutorial, exploring ways to find and learn about online biology computational tools, is the paper “OpenHelix: bioinformatics education outside of a different box” published in a special issue of Briefings in Bioinformatics entitled “Special Issue: Education in Bioinformatics“. This paper describes a wide range of repositories where researchers can access informal educational sources of learning on publicly available bioinformatics resources. These include a wide variety of formats and strategies including lists of resources, journals that regularly feature tool descriptions, and eLearning resources sources such as the MIT OpenCourseWare effort.