Tag Archives: COGE

Video Tips of the Week: Annual Review IV, 2nd half

As you may know, we’ve been doing these video tips-of-the-week for FOUR years now. We have completed around 200 little tidbit introductions to various resources from last year, 2011 (yep, it’s 2012 now). At the end of the year we’ve established a sort of holiday tradition: we are doing a summary post to collect them all. If you have missed any of them it’s a great way to have a quick look at what might be useful to your work.

You can see past years’ tips here: 2008 I2008 II2009 I2009 II2010 I2010 II. The summary of the first half of 2011 is available from last week.

July 2011

July 6: Prioritizing genes using the Gene Prioritization Portal

July 13: PolySearch, searching many databases at once

July 20: Human Epigenomics Visualization Hub

July 27: The new SIB Bioinformatics Resource Portal

 

August 2011

August 3: SNPexp, correlation between SNPs and gene expression 

August 10: CompaGB for comparing genome browser software

August 17: CoGe, comparing genomes revisited

August 24: Domain Draw for quick motif diagrams

August 31: From UniProt to the PSI SBKB and back again

 

September 2011

September 7: Plant comparative genomics using Plaza

September 14: phiGENOME for bacteriophage genome exploration

September 21: Getting flanking sequences of genomic locations

September 28: Introduction to R statistical software 

 

October 2011

October 5: VnD resource for genetic variation and drug information

October 12: Track Hubs in UCSC Genome Browser

October 19: Mitochondrial Transcriptome GBrowser 

October 26: Variation data from Ensembl

 

November 2011

November 2: MizBee Synteny Browser

November 9: The new database of genomic variants: DGV2

November 16: MapMi, automated mapping of microRNA loci

November 23: BioMart’s new central portal

November 30: Phosphida, a post-translational modification database

December 2011

December 7: VarSifter, for identifying key sequence variations

December 14: Big changes to NCBI’s genome resources

December 21: eggNOG for the Holidays (or to explore orthologous genes)

December 28: Video Tips of the Week: Annual Review IV (first half of 2011)

Tip of the Week: CoGe (comparing genomes) revisited

I did a tip on CoGe’s tool, GeVo about two years ago and we’ve had a guest post about CoGe from Eric Lyons, the lead developer of CoGe just over a year ago. In our ongoing and occasional quest to keep our tips fresh (and move them to SciVee), I’ve decided to revisit CoGe and one of their tools. CoGe has changed a bit since we last visited it (see some of the changes here). There is a new interface, more documentation and many more tutorials, some new tools and interconnections and a lot more genomes.  I’m going to give a brief introduction to SynMap and going to use it to do a genome rearrangement analysis (a subject of a text tutorial at the site).ResearchBlogging.org

The algorithm selected in the example is QUOTA-ALIGN which is the subject of a recent paper, “Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisions through integer programming” in BMC Bioinformatics. As the paper conclusion states:

The QUOTA-ALIGN algorithm screens a set of synteny blocks to retain only those compatible with a user specified ploidy relationship between two genomes. These blocks, in turn, may be used for additional downstream analyses such as identifying true orthologous regions in interspecific comparisons.

And as mentioned, and you’ll see in this tip, “QUOTA-ALIGN program is also integrated as a major component in SynMap http://genomevolution.com/CoGe/SynMap.pl webcite, offering easier access to thousands of genomes for non-programmers.
Tang, H., Lyons, E., Pedersen, B., Schnable, J., Paterson, A., & Freeling, M. (2011). Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisons through integer programming BMC Bioinformatics, 12 (1) DOI: 10.1186/1471-2105-12-102

Guest Post: CoGe, The Suite for Comparative Genomics – Eric Lyons

This next post in our continuing semi-regular Guest Post series is from Eric Lyons, of CoGe at the University of California, Berkeley. If you are a provider of a free, publicly available genomics tool, database or resource and would like to convey something to users on our guest post feature, please feel free to contact us at wlathe AT openhelix DOT com.

Thanks both for the prior CoGe post (editors note: a tip of the week on GoGe) and the invitation to write a bit about CoGe.  Since most people are probably not familiar with CoGe, let me begin with how it is designed:

CoGe’s architecture and philosophy:  Solve a problem once

CoGe is a web-based platform for comparative genomics and consists of many interconnected web-based tools.  The entire system is hooked up to a database that can store any version of any genome in any state of assembly from any organism (currently ~9000 genomes from ~8000 organisms). Each of CoGe’s tools is designed to do one task (e.g. search and display information about a genome, compare two genomes and generate syntenic dotplots, search any number of genomes for similar sequence, manage a list of genes, etc.), and are linked to one another. This means that there is no predefined analysis workflow. Instead, people can begin exploring a genome of interest, compare it to what they want, find something interesting, explore that, finding something else, explore that, etc.) People anywhere in the world can perform computationally intense analyses by clicking a few buttons on a web-page, and letting our servers crunch away on whatever genomes we have currently loaded in our system .  Since each tool is web-based, links are used to move from tool to tool which creates an easy way to save an analysis for future work or to send to a colleague. This also has the benefit that as we develop new tools to solve a specific problem, we can generalize the solution, and plug it into CoGe’s database and connect it to its pre-existing tool set. Overall, this allows an easy way for us to expand CoGe’s functionality.

Continue reading

Tip of the Week: GeVo and Genome Comparison

gevo_thumbToday’s tip of the week introduces a new (to us) tool for genomic comparisons. We came across this tool reading a blog post at James and the Giant Corn (great blog) about a figure from his research proposal. See, there are reasons to read blogs :D. The tool he uses to create this figure and analysis is GeVo at CoGe which has several useful tools in addition to GeVo. In today’s tip of the week, we’ll take a quick look at James’ figure at GeVo and introduce CoGe. Check them out, they look like quite useful tools. (and while you’re at it, check out  James’ blog. Tidbits like this and interesting discussions make it well worth it.)

We will celebrate DNA Day!

At OpenHelix, we certainly appreciate DNA! So we wanted to join in the festivities on DNA Day–this year the party is April 25, just about a week from today.

DNA Day commemorates the completion* of the human genome sequencing project. Annually there are special events, teaching and learning opportunities, and sometimes cupcakes**.
francis_collins_dnaday081.jpg

We are going to have something to offer, but we aren’t telling what just yet. Be sure to come back on Friday April 25th to see what we have available here. In the meantime, you might enjoy hearing Francis Collins talk about DNA Day. Did you know there will be a national chat room on that day? Or you might consider signing on to the COGE board: the Community of Genetic Educators. There are other ways to get involved–I know the American Society of Human Genetics organizes around this as well.

DNA Day at the NIH: http://www.genome.gov/20519692

ASHG Genetics Education and Outreach: http://genednet.org/pages/k12_mentor.shtml

*yeah, I know. But that’s the way it is told.

**maybe that’s just me. Down the street from me they make the best cupcakes in the world.