Tag Archives: biomart

Friday SNPpets

Welcome to our Friday feature link collection: SNPpets. During the week we come across a lot of links and reads that we think are interesting, but don’t make it to a blog post. Here they are for your enjoyment…

  • Chromothripsis – new model for some cancers? From GenomeWeb Daily News. I’m interested in seeing follow up studies on this. [Jennifer]
  • A new data source added to the BioMart Central portal: “EMAGE, a database of in situ gene expression data in the mouse embryo, has been added to BioMart Central Portal. The EMAGE website can be found at http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage/ and the EMAGE BioMart server can be found at http://biomart.emouseatlas.org/” (via the Mart-dev mailing list) [Mary]
  • Another potential outlet for scientists wanting to get involved: the Global Knowledge Initiative who’s goal is [Jennifer]

    We build global knowledge partnerships between individuals and institutions of higher education and research. We help partners access the global knowledge, technology, and human resources needed to sustain growth and achieve prosperity for all.

  • From GenomeWeb – an announcement about MoDEL the ‘World’s Largest Protein Video Database’ – it is free for academic, not-for-profit use. I haven’t tried it at all, but it sounds like it might be cool. Let us know if you check it out! [Jennifer]
  • Announcement from the International Cancer Genome Consortium (where you can access the data using the cutting edge BioMart build…Hat tip to @bffo: Update on ICGC website with a simplified application process for controlled access data  #bioinformatics #cancer #genomics  http://icgc.org/ [Mary]
  • Another resource for protein-protein and drug-protein interactions: PROMISCUOUS [Jennifer]
  • There’s a new Announcement mailing list for BioMart, as it gets migrated from the former EBI location.  Announce and Users lists are available–if you were on them you probably got automatically migrated. If you want to sign up, see this note:  [mart-announce] New BioMart announce and users mailing lists.  Hmm, that’s not entirely helpful as it hides the addresses you need. They are: mart-dev@ebi.ac.uk becomes users@biomart.org and mart-announce@ebi.ac.uk becomes announce@biomart.org [Mary]
  • REViGO – a resource for reducing and visualizing Gene Ontology trees, described in this paper: Supek F et al. PLoS Genet 6(6): e1001004. [Jennifer]

Workshop: World Tour of Genome Browser and Galaxy of Analysis Tools

Would like to just announce that Mary and I will be giving an all-day hands-on workshop on Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010 in Washington DC (my home town), right before the ASHG conference (where we will also be). The title of the workshop is A World Tour of Genome Browsers and a Galaxy of Analysis Tools. We’ll be covering UCSC Genome and Table Browsers, an overview of other genome browsers, BioMart, Galaxy and a tour of genome resources and how to find them. For more information on location, cost, topics you can continue reading here. There are workshops on UCSC and Galaxy at ASHG  for attendess (which we will be at, but Bob, Anton and others will be doing), but those have sold out and filled up. We are offering this workshop for those who would like to learn these topics and more, both DC residents and ASHG attendees.

To purchase a seat and register, go to our upcoming workshops page.

Continue reading

The data isn’t in the papers anymore, you know.

This week I was working on finishing up some training materials on the ENCODE data. We’ve talked about this before, and we’ve had some materials out already to support the ENCODE project, since we have a contract with the folks at UCSC to do some training on it. (The new materials should be out later this month.) But we were out doing a workshop on this data/software recently and we had a really great thing happen.

In the workshop we got to the exercise where I showed the attendees how to add the data for the GATA1 transcription factor binding sites to the visualization. This data is part of the Yale Transcription Factor Binding Site track.

In the front row of the training room, a researcher actually started to giggle.  Sometimes you can have fun in software training, but this was different. This woman was so happy to have discovered something she didn’t know before about GATA1 binding near her gene of interest that she was beside herself with delight.

Maybe this happens when she reads papers, too. But it struck me that what she had just done was come across something that isn’t in the papers. And that specific item may not be in the papers for a long time. But because she knew how to use the UCSC Genome Browser, and because she is now aware of the ENCODE data in the browser, she discovered something important for her research.

And that’s not in the literature. It’s in the databases.

I was also recently using the International Cancer Genome Consortium site’s new BioMart interface at their Data Coordination Center.  With their recent update they added some new features, I was using the new view of “Affected Genes” on that page. I picked a cancer type, I loaded up the Protein Coding genes, and there I was looking at the genes that had been repeatedly found to be affected in patient after patient. Some of the genes were not a surprise, certainly. But I sat there looking at data that a lot of people don’t know about–because it’s not in the papers yet. And it may not be for a long time.

Now, both of these “big data” projects have caveats: this data is pre-publication. Although there are some levels of QC, it should be considered as preliminary and you need to do due diligence before running off with conclusions about it. And both projects have data usage policies about how far you can take it before the embargo or moratorium is considered lifted. But still: you could make discoveries that no one else has made yet if you 1) are aware that this data is there, and 2) know how to use the software to get at it. There’s really no other way to know it.

That said, I know there are issues with the information in databases. A paper spoke to some issues of mis-annotation of data (Schnoes et al below):

Due to the rapid release of new data from genome sequencing projects, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized; rather, sequences are annotated using computational analysis. The level of misannotation and the types of misannotation in large public databases are currently unknown and have not been analyzed in depth…..

So you need to be aware of that. And you need to confirm what you are seeing. But again–you need: 1) awareness of the tools used to do this, and 2) training on how to use tools to be sure you are getting appropriate information.

That’s also not in the papers anymore. It’s up to you.

There are so many projects of this nature out there now. We know of many species, data types, and topics that are just tossing great stuff into the ethers….and so many people don’t realize it. I just wish I had time to mine it all myself. There’s some real gems of discovery out there.  But you need a map, and you need some tools. And I want to hear more giggling, people. Get on it, please.

Reference:
Schnoes, A., Brown, S., Dodevski, I., & Babbitt, P. (2009). Annotation Error in Public Databases: Misannotation of Molecular Function in Enzyme Superfamilies PLoS Computational Biology, 5 (12) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000605

Rosenbloom, K., Dreszer, T., Pheasant, M., Barber, G., Meyer, L., Pohl, A., Raney, B., Wang, T., Hinrichs, A., Zweig, A., Fujita, P., Learned, K., Rhead, B., Smith, K., Kuhn, R., Karolchik, D., Haussler, D., & Kent, W. (2009). ENCODE whole-genome data in the UCSC Genome Browser Nucleic Acids Research, 38 (Database) DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkp961

Hudson (Chairperson), T., Anderson, W., Aretz, A., Barker, A., Bell, C., Bernabé, R., Bhan, M., Calvo, F., Eerola, I., Gerhard, D., Guttmacher, A., Guyer, M., Hemsley, F., Jennings, J., Kerr, D., Klatt, P., Kolar, P., Kusuda, J., Lane, D., Laplace, F., Lu, Y., Nettekoven, G., Ozenberger, B., Peterson, J., Rao, T., Remacle, J., Schafer, A., Shibata, T., Stratton, M., Vockley, J., Watanabe, K., Yang, H., Yuen, M., Knoppers (Leader), B., Bobrow, M., Cambon-Thomsen, A., Dressler, L., Dyke, S., Joly, Y., Kato, K., Kennedy, K., Nicolás, P., Parker, M., Rial-Sebbag, E., Romeo-Casabona, C., Shaw, K., Wallace, S., Wiesner, G., Zeps, N., Lichter (Leader), P., Biankin, A., Chabannon, C., Chin, L., Clément, B., de Alava, E., Degos, F., Ferguson, M., Geary, P., Hayes, D., Hudson, T., Johns, A., Kasprzyk, A., Nakagawa, H., Penny, R., Piris, M., Sarin, R., Scarpa, A., Shibata, T., van de Vijver, M., Futreal (Leader), P., Aburatani, H., Bayés, M., Bowtell, D., Campbell, P., Estivill, X., Gerhard, D., Grimmond, S., Gut, I., Hirst, M., López-Otín, C., Majumder, P., Marra, M., McPherson, J., Nakagawa, H., Ning, Z., Puente, X., Ruan, Y., Shibata, T., Stratton, M., Stunnenberg, H., Swerdlow, H., Velculescu, V., Wilson, R., Xue, H., Yang, L., Spellman (Leader), P., Bader, G., Boutros, P., Campbell, P., Flicek, P., Getz, G., Guigó, R., Guo, G., Haussler, D., Heath, S., Hubbard, T., Jiang, T., Jones, S., Li, Q., López-Bigas, N., Luo, R., Muthuswamy, L., Francis Ouellette, B., Pearson, J., Puente, X., Quesada, V., Raphael, B., Sander, C., Shibata, T., Speed, T., Stein, L., Stuart, J., Teague, J., Totoki, Y., Tsunoda, T., Valencia, A., Wheeler, D., Wu, H., Zhao, S., Zhou, G., Stein (Leader), L., Guigó, R., Hubbard, T., Joly, Y., Jones, S., Kasprzyk, A., Lathrop, M., López-Bigas, N., Francis Ouellette, B., Spellman, P., Teague, J., Thomas, G., Valencia, A., Yoshida, T., Kennedy (Leader), K., Axton, M., Dyke, S., Futreal, P., Gerhard, D., Gunter, C., Guyer, M., Hudson, T., McPherson, J., Miller, L., Ozenberger, B., Shaw, K., Kasprzyk (Leader), A., Stein (Leader), L., Zhang, J., Haider, S., Wang, J., Yung, C., Cross, A., Liang, Y., Gnaneshan, S., Guberman, J., Hsu, J., Bobrow (Leader), M., Chalmers, D., Hasel, K., Joly, Y., Kaan, T., Kennedy, K., Knoppers, B., Lowrance, W., Masui, T., Nicolás, P., Rial-Sebbag, E., Lyman Rodriguez, L., Vergely, C., Yoshida, T., Grimmond (Leader), S., Biankin, A., Bowtell, D., Cloonan, N., deFazio, A., Eshleman, J., Etemadmoghadam, D., Gardiner, B., Kench, J., Scarpa, A., Sutherland, R., Tempero, M., Waddell, N., Wilson, P., McPherson (Leader), J., Gallinger, S., Tsao, M., Shaw, P., Petersen, G., Mukhopadhyay, D., Chin, L., DePinho, R., Thayer, S., Muthuswamy, L., Shazand, K., Beck, T., Sam, M., Timms, L., Ballin, V., Lu (Leader), Y., Ji, J., Zhang, X., Chen, F., Hu, X., Zhou, G., Yang, Q., Tian, G., Zhang, L., Xing, X., Li, X., Zhu, Z., Yu, Y., Yu, J., Yang, H., Lathrop (Leader), M., Tost, J., Brennan, P., Holcatova, I., Zaridze, D., Brazma, A., Egevad, L., Prokhortchouk, E., Elizabeth Banks, R., Uhlén, M., Cambon-Thomsen, A., Viksna, J., Ponten, F., Skryabin, K., Stratton (Leader), M., Futreal, P., Birney, E., Borg, A., Børresen-Dale, A., Caldas, C., Foekens, J., Martin, S., Reis-Filho, J., Richardson, A., Sotiriou, C., Stunnenberg, H., Thomas, G., van de Vijver, M., van’t Veer, L., Calvo (Leader), F., Birnbaum, D., Blanche, H., Boucher, P., Boyault, S., Chabannon, C., Gut, I., Masson-Jacquemier, J., Lathrop, M., Pauporté, I., Pivot, X., Vincent-Salomon, A., Tabone, E., Theillet, C., Thomas, G., Tost, J., Treilleux, I., Calvo (Leader), F., Bioulac-Sage, P., Clément, B., Decaens, T., Degos, F., Franco, D., Gut, I., Gut, M., Heath, S., Lathrop, M., Samuel, D., Thomas, G., Zucman-Rossi, J., Lichter (Leader), P., Eils (Leader), R., Brors, B., Korbel, J., Korshunov, A., Landgraf, P., Lehrach, H., Pfister, S., Radlwimmer, B., Reifenberger, G., Taylor, M., von Kalle, C., Majumder (Leader), P., Sarin, R., Rao, T., Bhan, M., Scarpa (Leader), A., Pederzoli, P., Lawlor, R., Delledonne, M., Bardelli, A., Biankin, A., Grimmond, S., Gress, T., Klimstra, D., Zamboni, G., Shibata (Leader), T., Nakamura, Y., Nakagawa, H., Kusuda, J., Tsunoda, T., Miyano, S., Aburatani, H., Kato, K., Fujimoto, A., Yoshida, T., Campo (Leader), E., López-Otín, C., Estivill, X., Guigó, R., de Sanjosé, S., Piris, M., Montserrat, E., González-Díaz, M., Puente, X., Jares, P., Valencia, A., Himmelbaue, H., Quesada, V., Bea, S., Stratton (Leader), M., Futreal, P., Campbell, P., Vincent-Salomon, A., Richardson, A., Reis-Filho, J., van de Vijver, M., Thomas, G., Masson-Jacquemier, J., Aparicio, S., Borg, A., Børresen-Dale, A., Caldas, C., Foekens, J., Stunnenberg, H., van’t Veer, L., Easton, D., Spellman, P., Martin, S., Barker, A., Chin, L., Collins, F., Compton, C., Ferguson, M., Gerhard, D., Getz, G., Gunter, C., Guttmacher, A., Guyer, M., Hayes, D., Lander, E., Ozenberger, B., Penny, R., Peterson, J., Sander, C., Shaw, K., Speed, T., Spellman, P., Vockley, J., Wheeler, D., Wilson, R., Hudson (Chairperson), T., Chin, L., Knoppers, B., Lander, E., Lichter, P., Stein, L., Stratton, M., Anderson, W., Barker, A., Bell, C., Bobrow, M., Burke, W., Collins, F., Compton, C., DePinho, R., Easton, D., Futreal, P., Gerhard, D., Green, A., Guyer, M., Hamilton, S., Hubbard, T., Kallioniemi, O., Kennedy, K., Ley, T., Liu, E., Lu, Y., Majumder, P., Marra, M., Ozenberger, B., Peterson, J., Schafer, A., Spellman, P., Stunnenberg, H., Wainwright, B., Wilson, R., & Yang, H. (2010). International network of cancer genome projects Nature, 464 (7291), 993-998 DOI: 10.1038/nature08987

Tip of the Week: International Cancer Genome Consortium

So, remember that tidal wave of data we were going to get from the human genome project?  Yeah.  That was a puddle compared to what’s coming your way now. For this week’s tip of the week I will introduce the very ambitious big data project from the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).  In addition, you’ll get your first look at the shiny new interface for BioMart!

People reading this blog know that we have made great progress on many fronts in the war on cancer.  But there’s an awful lot we don’t know yet.  The ICGC network of researchers plans to change that.  This international group of researchers has organized and standardized an effort to learn about tumors.  From their homepage:

ICGC Goal: To obtain a comprehensive description of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic changes in 50 different tumor types and/or subtypes which are of clinical and societal importance across the globe.

Check that out:

  • 50 tumor types.  Oh–and by the way–they will also obtain a normal tissue same from the same individual so you can see what’s part of the normal constitution and what has changed in the tumor.
  • Hundreds of samples of that tumor type.  Except for some rare tumors, they intend to obtain 500 of each tumor.
  • More than a dozen types of cancer. Breast, lung, brain, pancreas, liver, leukemia…and on and on.
  • Genomic. Transcriptomic. Epigenomic.  Each of these is a separate data set that needs to be obtained.  Oh, and already there are simple variations (small numbers of nucleotides), CNVs, structural re-arrangements, expression data….And that’s just the initial release.

Are you overwhelmed yet?  50 x 500 x more than a dozen x 3+ types of data (and that’s just back-of-the-napkin, there’s more…)  I am daunted just thinking about the scale of this.

They have organized and standardized the protocols, technologies, data collection, data submissions, and more.  You should check out their marker paper for a complete description of their framework.  They are going to make 2 types of data available: open access data that is de-identified.  And there is a controlled access data set with clinical details that you’ll have to register for access to.

Do note though: the data (like all these large data projects) is subject to data usage policies that you need to be aware of.  There is a publication moratorium that enables the data submitters a window to publish their findings before others are allowed to publish.  It’s that typical balance of rapid access to data + a non-scoop window for the data providers.  Be sure to familiarize yourself with the policies if you are going to use this data.

But let’s say you are ready for it–you understand the framework, you understand the usage policies–how do you get the data?  You use the very cool new interface for BioMart to do it!  This is your first opportunity to look at the GUI developed for BioMart v 0.8.  There’s more coming, this is an early version.  But that’s how you are going to be able to build great custom queries on the underlying data and pull it down.  You may be familiar with BioMart from any number of places now (Ensembl, Gramene, FlyBase, WormBase….more).  But this is the first implementation of the new look–you are going to want to check that out.

For this week’s Tip of the Week you’ll see the ICGC site, and a quick query of the initial data that is available in the Data Coordination Center (DCC).  But this is just an appetizer.  Brace yourselves–the deluge is coming.

A Nature News article offers a nice overview, but be sure to check out the full paper for the project details.

The International Cancer Genome Consortium site: http://icgc.org/

Oh, and this made me laugh:

Be sure to contact the ICGC team if you have any questions.  they want to help you to use this data, and will be happy to answer your questions.  Personally, I’m making it a mission to help them populate the FAQ–I’ve sent in questions.  And so far my answers have been quite speedy :)

Oy. The reference is longer than the blog post.  Sigh.

Hudson (Chairperson), T., Anderson, W., Aretz, A., Barker, A., Bell, C., Bernabé, R., Bhan, M., Calvo, F., Eerola, I., Gerhard, D., Guttmacher, A., Guyer, M., Hemsley, F., Jennings, J., Kerr, D., Klatt, P., Kolar, P., Kusuda, J., Lane, D., Laplace, F., Lu, Y., Nettekoven, G., Ozenberger, B., Peterson, J., Rao, T., Remacle, J., Schafer, A., Shibata, T., Stratton, M., Vockley, J., Watanabe, K., Yang, H., Yuen, M., Knoppers (Leader), B., Bobrow, M., Cambon-Thomsen, A., Dressler, L., Dyke, S., Joly, Y., Kato, K., Kennedy, K., Nicolás, P., Parker, M., Rial-Sebbag, E., Romeo-Casabona, C., Shaw, K., Wallace, S., Wiesner, G., Zeps, N., Lichter (Leader), P., Biankin, A., Chabannon, C., Chin, L., Clément, B., de Alava, E., Degos, F., Ferguson, M., Geary, P., Hayes, D., Hudson, T., Johns, A., Kasprzyk, A., Nakagawa, H., Penny, R., Piris, M., Sarin, R., Scarpa, A., Shibata, T., van de Vijver, M., Futreal (Leader), P., Aburatani, H., Bayés, M., Bowtell, D., Campbell, P., Estivill, X., Gerhard, D., Grimmond, S., Gut, I., Hirst, M., López-Otín, C., Majumder, P., Marra, M., McPherson, J., Nakagawa, H., Ning, Z., Puente, X., Ruan, Y., Shibata, T., Stratton, M., Stunnenberg, H., Swerdlow, H., Velculescu, V., Wilson, R., Xue, H., Yang, L., Spellman (Leader), P., Bader, G., Boutros, P., Campbell, P., Flicek, P., Getz, G., Guigó, R., Guo, G., Haussler, D., Heath, S., Hubbard, T., Jiang, T., Jones, S., Li, Q., López-Bigas, N., Luo, R., Muthuswamy, L., Francis Ouellette, B., Pearson, J., Puente, X., Quesada, V., Raphael, B., Sander, C., Shibata, T., Speed, T., Stein, L., Stuart, J., Teague, J., Totoki, Y., Tsunoda, T., Valencia, A., Wheeler, D., Wu, H., Zhao, S., Zhou, G., Stein (Leader), L., Guigó, R., Hubbard, T., Joly, Y., Jones, S., Kasprzyk, A., Lathrop, M., López-Bigas, N., Francis Ouellette, B., Spellman, P., Teague, J., Thomas, G., Valencia, A., Yoshida, T., Kennedy (Leader), K., Axton, M., Dyke, S., Futreal, P., Gerhard, D., Gunter, C., Guyer, M., Hudson, T., McPherson, J., Miller, L., Ozenberger, B., Shaw, K., Kasprzyk (Leader), A., Stein (Leader), L., Zhang, J., Haider, S., Wang, J., Yung, C., Cross, A., Liang, Y., Gnaneshan, S., Guberman, J., Hsu, J., Bobrow (Leader), M., Chalmers, D., Hasel, K., Joly, Y., Kaan, T., Kennedy, K., Knoppers, B., Lowrance, W., Masui, T., Nicolás, P., Rial-Sebbag, E., Lyman Rodriguez, L., Vergely, C., Yoshida, T., Grimmond (Leader), S., Biankin, A., Bowtell, D., Cloonan, N., deFazio, A., Eshleman, J., Etemadmoghadam, D., Gardiner, B., Kench, J., Scarpa, A., Sutherland, R., Tempero, M., Waddell, N., Wilson, P., McPherson (Leader), J., Gallinger, S., Tsao, M., Shaw, P., Petersen, G., Mukhopadhyay, D., Chin, L., DePinho, R., Thayer, S., Muthuswamy, L., Shazand, K., Beck, T., Sam, M., Timms, L., Ballin, V., Lu (Leader), Y., Ji, J., Zhang, X., Chen, F., Hu, X., Zhou, G., Yang, Q., Tian, G., Zhang, L., Xing, X., Li, X., Zhu, Z., Yu, Y., Yu, J., Yang, H., Lathrop (Leader), M., Tost, J., Brennan, P., Holcatova, I., Zaridze, D., Brazma, A., Egevad, L., Prokhortchouk, E., Elizabeth Banks, R., Uhlén, M., Cambon-Thomsen, A., Viksna, J., Ponten, F., Skryabin, K., Stratton (Leader), M., Futreal, P., Birney, E., Borg, A., Børresen-Dale, A., Caldas, C., Foekens, J., Martin, S., Reis-Filho, J., Richardson, A., Sotiriou, C., Stunnenberg, H., Thomas, G., van de Vijver, M., van’t Veer, L., Calvo (Leader), F., Birnbaum, D., Blanche, H., Boucher, P., Boyault, S., Chabannon, C., Gut, I., Masson-Jacquemier, J., Lathrop, M., Pauporté, I., Pivot, X., Vincent-Salomon, A., Tabone, E., Theillet, C., Thomas, G., Tost, J., Treilleux, I., Calvo (Leader), F., Bioulac-Sage, P., Clément, B., Decaens, T., Degos, F., Franco, D., Gut, I., Gut, M., Heath, S., Lathrop, M., Samuel, D., Thomas, G., Zucman-Rossi, J., Lichter (Leader), P., Eils (Leader), R., Brors, B., Korbel, J., Korshunov, A., Landgraf, P., Lehrach, H., Pfister, S., Radlwimmer, B., Reifenberger, G., Taylor, M., von Kalle, C., Majumder (Leader), P., Sarin, R., Rao, T., Bhan, M., Scarpa (Leader), A., Pederzoli, P., Lawlor, R., Delledonne, M., Bardelli, A., Biankin, A., Grimmond, S., Gress, T., Klimstra, D., Zamboni, G., Shibata (Leader), T., Nakamura, Y., Nakagawa, H., Kusuda, J., Tsunoda, T., Miyano, S., Aburatani, H., Kato, K., Fujimoto, A., Yoshida, T., Campo (Leader), E., López-Otín, C., Estivill, X., Guigó, R., de Sanjosé, S., Piris, M., Montserrat, E., González-Díaz, M., Puente, X., Jares, P., Valencia, A., Himmelbaue, H., Quesada, V., Bea, S., Stratton (Leader), M., Futreal, P., Campbell, P., Vincent-Salomon, A., Richardson, A., Reis-Filho, J., van de Vijver, M., Thomas, G., Masson-Jacquemier, J., Aparicio, S., Borg, A., Børresen-Dale, A., Caldas, C., Foekens, J., Stunnenberg, H., van’t Veer, L., Easton, D., Spellman, P., Martin, S., Barker, A., Chin, L., Collins, F., Compton, C., Ferguson, M., Gerhard, D., Getz, G., Gunter, C., Guttmacher, A., Guyer, M., Hayes, D., Lander, E., Ozenberger, B., Penny, R., Peterson, J., Sander, C., Shaw, K., Speed, T., Spellman, P., Vockley, J., Wheeler, D., Wilson, R., Hudson (Chairperson), T., Chin, L., Knoppers, B., Lander, E., Lichter, P., Stein, L., Stratton, M., Anderson, W., Barker, A., Bell, C., Bobrow, M., Burke, W., Collins, F., Compton, C., DePinho, R., Easton, D., Futreal, P., Gerhard, D., Green, A., Guyer, M., Hamilton, S., Hubbard, T., Kallioniemi, O., Kennedy, K., Ley, T., Liu, E., Lu, Y., Majumder, P., Marra, M., Ozenberger, B., Peterson, J., Schafer, A., Spellman, P., Stunnenberg, H., Wainwright, B., Wilson, R., & Yang, H. (2010). International network of cancer genome projects Nature, 464 (7291), 993-998 DOI: 10.1038/nature08987

GMOD summer school–homework!

Well, ok, you aren’t required to do the homework–it’s just available for you if you want to work on setting up GMOD tools around your projects (or at home, if you want…).

We mentioned that the GMOD summer school was going on, and now that it’s all successfully wrapped up many of the materials are available as tutorials on the GMOD site: http://gmod.org/wiki/Training_and_Outreach

These are mostly installation and configuration tutorials for the software components.  Although the end user tutorial we created for GBrowse is in the list as well–the emphasis is definitely on developers.

The tools included in this tutorial collection are all pieces of the GMOD suite.

  • Apollo, a genome annotation editor.
  • BioMart, a data mining system that lets you build complex queries from the underlying databases.
  • Chado,relational database underlying the GMOD tools.
  • CMap, comparative genomics tool for viewing maps
  • GBrowse, a genome browser used at for many species.
  • MAKER, genome annotation pipeline.
  • Tripal, a front-end to Chado databases.

As more and more people get next-generation sequencing data for their species of interest these tools and support for them will be increasingly crucial.

Video Tip of the Week: A Mouse for All Reasons

At first the title of this paper made laugh, as I am a major fan of Paul Scofield’s performance in A Man for All Seasons.  And then I remembered what happened to Thomas More.  Well, the analogy drops away for me there…. A Mouse for All Reasons by the International Mouse Knockout Consortium presented the framework and foundations of the project to knock out every single protein-coding gene in mice, generate the corresponding ES (embryonic stem) cells, and make them available for development of subsequent transgenic mice.  Some of these mice will go on to give their life for science in a noble manner, I guess–so maybe the analogy picks back up :)

The project has made tremendous progress since that paper was published, and there are a lot of knockouts you should know about if you are interested in using mouse as a model organism.

For this tip of the week we’ll explore the new portal for the International Mouse Knockout Consortium (IMKC), which used to be at the URL for the KOMP, or Knock Out Mouse Project. It appears that the groups referenced in the Mouse for All Reasons paper have now harmonized on to the knockoutmouse.org site, and use a single portal for access to the information and reagents.  There are a variety of ways to search: browsing genes, specific text searching, and even a BioMart interface for the portal.  This short movie takes a look at those pieces to introduce you to the site.

The announcement for this came over the MGI mailing list as this:

The IKMC web portal

The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has launched its official web site at www.knockoutmouse.org, formerly the URL for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP). This extended site, supported by the NIH and EU, now serves as the common web portal for access to information on knockout vectors, ES cells and mice available from the international high-throughput knockout projects: KOMP, EUCOMM, NorCOMM and TIGM. Stay tuned for future enhancements as the content continues to evolve. We welcome your comments and feedback. (Please email to contact@knockoutmouse.org).

This site is maintained by the I-DCC and the KOMP-DCC

(http://www.knockoutmouse.org/about) . Supported by the European Union (Project number: 223592) and the National Institutes of Health (Grant number: NIH HG004074).

The International Mouse Knockout Consortium (2007). A Mouse for All Reasons Cell, 128 (1), 9-13 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2006.12.018

Important announcement from HapMap about data archiving

This is from the HapMap team for the human data (not the green HapMap I referenced recently). Older data is going to be removed from the HapMap.org browser and from BioMart. It will still be available in the ftp archive–but I just thought a heads-up was in order for folks who might not be on the mailing list:

Beginning July 1st, HapMap data releases prior to October 2008 (or release #24) will no longer be available via the HapMap Genome Browser and HapMart utility.

The following three data releases will continue to be served via the HapMap Genome Browser:

* HapMap Release #24 — Latest HapMap (phase I+II) data release

http://www.hapmap.org/cgi-perl/gbrowse/hapmap24_B36/

* HapMap3 Draft #2 (hapmap3_r2) — Latest HapMap3 (phase III) data release

http://www.hapmap.org/cgi-perl/gbrowse/hapmap3r2_B36/

* HapMap Release #27 — Latest merged HapMap (phase I+II+III) data release

http://www.hapmap.org/cgi-perl/gbrowse/hapmap27_B36/

The following data release will continue to be served via HapMart:
* HapMap Release #27 — Latest merged HapMap (phase I+II+III) data release

http://hapmart.hapmap.org/BioMart/martview

All other data releases will still be available for FTP download:

http://www.hapmap.org/downloads/index.html.en#bulk

If you aren’t on the mailing list you can check it out and sign up here: http://osceola.cshl.edu/mailman/listinfo/announcements

Timbits from Canada

This week I gave a talk about the OpenHelix business model and strategies at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR). It was a great meeting for me–since I wasn’t giving software training I got to attend the scientific sessions :) I learned about several new tools that I’ll talk more about after I’ve had a chance to explore them some more. I was especially pleased to see some of the new directions that BioMart will be taking.  But here are some quick things I gleaned in the north.  I call them Timbits because the funniest food name I ever heard was the Tim Horton’s donuts shops in Canada.  It is their equivalent of the donut-hole munchkin type things.  But I always wondered what bit of Tim they were supposed to be….alas…

  • The Canadian word for pick-up hockey is shinny.
  • Tim Bits is also the name for some kids hockey programs sponsored by Hortons.
  • This is the first scientific meeting I ever attended where the morning announcements of misplaced items included a hockey stick.
  • There is no apparent equivalent for the SBIR program in Canada for small business.  That’s too bad, it’s been a huge help for us and does stimulate the economy…. And there are Canadian entrepreneurs ready for this.
  • Food allergy labeling on buffets can be really effective and helpful.  The place I was at was great about potential allergens in the food. Unfortunately, the labeling of attendees was less helpful:veg_nuts

Tip of the Week: One search to rule them all

Ok, well not exactly (wouldn’t that be nice). What do Ensembl, Gramene, Reactome, Wormbase, HapMap and RGD databases all have in common? (other than “.org” ;)) They all have a search mechanism powered by the same software, BioMart. [link fixed; Mary] In this week’s tip we take a real quick look at these and other databases use of BioMart and briefly show you that the steps are the same (choose dataset, filter dataset, list attributes to show) and you can search some of them all at the same place.