Friday SNPpets

Welcome to our Friday feature link collection: SNPpets. During the week we come across a lot of links and reads that we think are interesting, but don’t make it to a blog post. Here they are for your enjoyment…

  • From Anil Dash & AAAS: a  free, open-source, technology platform named ThinkUp that allows users to “ask questions on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites while ThinkUp collects and organizes the responses so they can be searched, archived, or even plotted on a map.” Sounds pretty cool. [Jennifer]
  • @deanwbrandon: Training Series Webinars by the Plant Breeding and Genomics … bit.ly/rlxLWF [Mary]
  • From Nature Methods – “OpenFreezer: a reagent information management software system“. This resource  “is an open-source information management system for biological laboratories. ” (from their homepage) OpenFreezer is also dedicated by its software programmer to her mother, Larisa Olhovsky, ” as a guiding light for biological researchers on their path towards winning the battle against cancer and other diseases. ” Very nice. [Jennifer]
  • RT @genome_gov: Bettie Graham, Ph.D., an NHGRI grants pro, provides valuable tips for writing successful NIH grants. http://qoo.ly/6sg [Mary]
  • Heh: RT @genetics_blog: RT @thatdnaguy: Sometimes big #genetics datasets tell a story. Sometimes it’s just a data Rorschach test. #bioinformatics  #science [Mary]
  • Heh. Way to start a binary flame-war: RT @attilacsordas: what is more important for science in general: bioinformatics-savvy biologists or biology-savvy bioinformaticians? former? [Mary]
  • Very cool backstory here: Heh. “Team Alligator capitulated” MT @paleofreak: How Green Anole Selected as First Reptile Genome Sequenced. J Losos http://bit.ly/phqbOz [Mary]

My personal favorite this week [Mary]:

  • Quote of the week: This is a curious paper: if its conclusions had been correct, the whole foundation of modern genome biology would have come into question. Fortunately, its conclusions are wrong, and the key principle of comparative genomics is safe for now. –Michael Galperin And you should also look at his competing interests statement. ROFL!