Oy. I worry about this with cell line studies a lot. Mis-IDed + contaminated.

cellsVia NCBI Announce mailing list:

NCBI BioSample includes curated list of over 400 known misidentified and contaminated cell lines

The NCBI BioSample database now includes a curated list of over 400 known misidentified and contaminated cell lines. Scientists should check this list before they start working with a new cell line to see if that cell line is known to be misidentified.

Continuous cell lines are used widely in research as model systems for normal cellular processes and disease states. However, as noted by many (e.g. PubMed 23235867, 20143388, 19003294, 18072586, and 17522957), cell line cross-contamination or misidentification represents a serious and widespread problem, and researchers should take great care to check that their cell line is what they think it is. Cell lines can be easily mislabeled or become overgrown by cells derived from a different individual, tissue or species.

This problem is so common it is thought that thousands of misleading and potentially erroneous papers have been published using cell lines that are incorrectly identified (PubMed 20448633). The first step in combating this problem is to make sure your cell line is not on the list of known misidentified and cross-contaminated cell lines. Detailed information about how to test your cell lines is provided by the International Cell Line Authentication Committee.

NCBI BioSample curated list of misidentified and contaminated cell lines: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample/?term=cell%20line%20status%20misidentified[Attribute]

Articles on cell line cross-contamination and misidentification in PubMed mentioned above: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23235867+20143388+19003294+18072586+17522957+20448633%5Buid%5D

The International Cell Line Authentication Committee: http://iclac.org/

I also worry about SNV and all sorts of other issues within the cell lines. When the first data was coming out on CNVs in the ENCODE cell lines, I found duplications, and homozygous and heterozygous deletions, that would have concerned me if I was working on certain pathways. If I was still doing cell biology, I’d sequence my cell line of choice before I did another experiment with them.  Below I’ve linked to the PubMed reference they provided in the body.

Reference:

American Type Culture Collection Standards Development Organization Workgroup ASN-0002. (2010). Cell line misidentification: the beginning of the end, Nature Reviews Cancer, 10 (6) 441-448. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrc2852