Video Tip of the Week: Nowomics, set up alert feeds for new data

Yeah, I know you know. There’s a lot of genomics and proteomics data coming out every day–some of it in the traditional publication route, but some of it isn’t–and it’s only getting harder and harder to wrangle the useful information to access the signal from the noise.  I can remember when merely looking through the (er, paper-based) table of contents of Cell and Nature would get me up to speed for a week. But increasingly, the data I need isn’t even coming through the papers.

Like everyone else, I have a variety of strategies to keep notified of different things I need to see. I use the MyNCBI stored searches to keep me posted on things that come from via the NCBI system. I signed up for the OMIM new “MIM-Match” service as well. But there’s still a lot of room for new ways to collect and filter new data and information. Today’s tip focuses on a service to do that: Nowomics. This is a freely available tool to help you keep track of important new data. Here’s a quick video overview of how to see what’s going on with Nowomics.

The goal of Nowomics is to offer you an actively updated feed of relevant information on genes or topics of interest, using text mining and ontology term harvesting from a range of sources. What makes them different from MyNCBI or OMIM is the range and types of data sources they use. The user sets up some genes or Gene Ontology terms to “follow”, and the software regularly checks for changes in the source sites. You can go in an look at your feed, you can filter it for different types of data, and you can see what’s new (“latest”) or what’s being hotly chattered about (“popular”) using Altmetric strategies. For example, here’s a paper that people seemed to find worth talking about, based on the tweets and the Mendeley occurrences.

example_paper This tool is in early stages of development–if there are features you’d like to see or other sources you’d think are useful, the Nowomics team is eager for feedback. You can find a link to contact them over at their site, or locate them on Facebook and Twitter. You can also learn more from their blog. You can also learn more about the philosophy and foundations of Nowomics from their slide presentation below.


Quick links:


Example gene feed:


Acland A., T. Barrett, J. Beck, D. A. Benson, C. Bollin, E. Bolton, S. H. Bryant, K. Canese, D. M. Church & K. Clark & (2014). Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, Nucleic Acids Research, 42 (D1) D7-D17. DOI:

Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, OMIM®. McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD), July 22 2014. World Wide Web URL: