Tip of the Week: Yeast genome? There is an app for that!

GBrowse navigation basics tutorial from yeastgenome on Vimeo.

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) has several short video tutorials that introduce basic navigation (shown above), expression data and more.  Each of these tutorials are short, 1-2 minutes, and there are 21 of them (15 on yeastmine alone). If you want to go further in depth, we have a tutorial on the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) (subscription)also that is about an hour long, modular and includes exercises. We have also done tips on Yeastmine and other SGD related tools (open access). You can also find a tutorial at OpenHelix on GBrowse, which is the browser used at SGD. And there is this short 5 minute GBrowse video tutorial.

So, a yeast researcher has no lack for video training on using SGD.

But, today I wanted to introduce you to SGD’s new app for the mobile researcher: YeastGenome App. The app has some pretty decent functionality. As their FAQ enumerates:

yeastgenome-3-newipad

“Saccharomyces Genome Database by gene name or keyword to find fundamental information about your favorite gene. Browse the database by feature type and quickly view fundamental information, sequence information, Gene Ontology, interactions, phenotypes, and references associated with the terms.

Does the app have any other special features?
Yes, you can use the app to save your favorite genes in a convenient list. You can also e-mail yourself or your friends and colleagues any information you find about yeast genes in the Saccharomyces Genome Database.”

I’ve had a go at the app for a bit, and it makes browsing and searching yeast genome data pretty convenient and easy. The app was reported in this year’s Database issue at NAR and it gives a good rundown of the app. Don’t need convincing? Then you can go right to iTunes and get it now.

But this reminds me, I did a feature on mobile apps for genomics research last year that reviewed GeneWall, Wowser and MyGenome and the year before that introduced an app for “moving molecules”. THis new app and several I’ve seen in the interim since those posts suggest that perhaps it’s time to do a new post on mobile apps available for genome research.  Perhaps that will be the next tip of the week from me in a few weeks.